GRTV Ep. 61 Letter Lament “Z”

Series: GameRaveTV

Jason tackles 2 laments in one game this episode, which combine to ruin an other wise awesome game. Subscribe and Join the Fun! Support GameRaveTV and Get Cool Stuff http://www.patreon.com/gameravetv http://www.Game-Rave.com http://twitter.com/gamerave http://www.facebook.com/gameravetv Download GameRaveTV’s Opening / Ending Credits at: http://www.kendejong.bandcamp.com © 2014 Game-Rave.com All Original Content ©…

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Super Game Boy Special!

Move over NX, the Super Game Boy has been letting us take takes out on a portable, and play them on a television for two decades now! But did you also know about the Japan-only Super Game Boy 2, or Hori’s special Game Boy Commander gamepad, made especially for the Super Game Boy?

Watch this video and find out more about these awesome pieces of hardware, and see that the Super Game Boy wasn’t just about playing Game Boy games on the television – In fact, it added a lot more functionality than that!

Video Transcription

Who needs the NX when you can play Game Boy games on the big screen!

95% of Nintendo related chatter these days is gravitating towards their next console, the Nintendo NX. Supposedly the hybrid of home console and portable system, the possibilities are tantalising. Being able to take games out with you on a portable system and then take them back home and play on the television is an excellent evolution of what the Nintendo Wii U offered with its GamePad.

However, you’ve been able to do something very similar all along, with Nintendo’s very own Super Game Boy!

Released in 1994, the Super Game Boy was a nifty little device that let you play Game Boy cartridges on a television, via a Super Nintendo console. It’s design is simple – Plug your Game Boy game into the Super Game Boy, slide the whole lot into your SNES cartridge slot, turn the power on and away you go. The device itself was basically the Game Boy hardware in a cartridge, so it wasn’t just simple software emulation, it was as authentic as it got – Apart from the the fact that the Super Game Boy ran games ever so slightly faster than the original hardware.

But it was a great piece of kit, that also had a few other tricks up its sleeve. For a start, you can play games with palette other than the Game Boy’s trademark green hues. You can choose from a number of pre-made palettes, or even make your own, while some older Game Boy titles even had their own preset palettes that would be loaded instantly, such as Super Mario Land and Metroid II: Return of Samus.

A number of borders were also available that surrounded the virtual Game Boy screen, with some specific games even containing their own specific borders, such as the Pokemon series, and of course you could draw your own, and you could even use a SNES mouse if you have one.

If that wasn’t all, several Super Game Boy-enabled games had bonus options – Wario Blast allowed four players to play on the Super Game Boy with one cartridge via a multi-tap, while Street Fighter 2 enabled 2 players with just one copy of the game. Some games had better music and sound effects, while Space Invaders contained a proper 16-bit version of the game on its tiny cartridge.

The Super Game Boy eventually got even better, because Japan got a second revision of the hardware. The Super Game Boy 2 arrived in 1998 and is absolutely lovely to look at, with it’s transparent blue casing and LED power light. It added a link cable socket, perfect for playing multiplayer games or more specifically, allowing for trades and battles in Pokemon. It also added 8 new borders, including my personal favourite – One that mimics the transparent Game Boys that were released later on, so you can see a pixel rendition of the system’s innards. It also fixed the speed issues that I mentioned earlier, making for an even more authentic experience.

But wait, that’s not all all – Because, there’s only one way to truly experience the Super Game Boy and that’s to use Hori’s official Super Game Boy Commander gamepad. This special controller looks just like the Game Boy’s nether regions, containing an almost identical design, albeit with extra buttons. Not only does this pad make for a more enjoyable Game Boy experience, but it also makes navigating the Super Game Boy’s menus that little easier, with specially labelled buttons for menu functions. It also places all the shoulder buttons to the face of the pad, which has its uses for other SNES games.This is truly one of the best ways to play Game Boy games on your television, except maybe the Game Boy Player, which is another story for another time.

Thank you so much for taking the time to watch this video, and I hope you found it enlightening. As always, subscribes, comments and shares are always appreciated – I always reply to all comments, as well as Tweets to @PugHoofGaming. If you liked this video, there’s plenty more great content on my channel, so why not check out my other videos?

As always – until next time, keep gaming positive.

See The Tetris 64 Bio Sensor In Action!

Did you know there was a Nintendo 64 peripheral that took your pulse, and only worked with the Japan-only Tetris 64? It’s the Tetris 64 Bio Sensor!

Well watch this video, and not only will you know more, but you’ll actually SEE me play Bio Tetris while having my pulse taken. What does this all mean?

Watch and find out!

Video Transcription

I’m going to try and make my heartbeat go higher, by breathing heavily which is going to make me look like a complete twat.

So for the last two weeks, I’ve been talking about some of the pickups I’ve purchased from the London Gaming Market and this is the final video that I’m going to use to talk about that, and the reason why is that I thought I’d make a special video just for one particular item I purchased the other week and that is this little guy here and I’ve referred to is as a biosensor because that is basically what it is. This is a Japanese-only peripheral that only came out in Japan and was only released and used for one game in particular, and that is Tetris 64. I thought, since no-one really knows too much about these things, it would be the perfect opportunity to show you something that not many people have seen – Someone actually playing Tetris 64 using the Bio Sensor, to see how it works, so I’ve got my N64 pad here and we’re just going to plug this bad boy in. Then, I’m going to clip this little thing to me ear here so it can take my pulse – It’s quite difficult to actually keep it on, it’s not very tight which is good in some ways, but I’m worried it’ll fall off a bit.

I’m going to start the game, and then see what we’ve got. We’ve got all sorts of different modes, luckily the menu is in English! So there’s a Sensor Check option, just to make sure it’s all working, so it’s taking my pulse – I don’t know if that’s good or not; 90 to 100. That’s probably normal, I guess. Hopefully. I don’t know if that actually changes depending on me talking as well, so lets see if that works.

There’s a Bio Tetris mode, and I haven’t actually properly played this yet, so I’m not sure what to expect. It’s my understanding that when I play this game, it’ll take my pulse and it will change the difficulty the game speed accordingly. So I’m going to start off on level 3, I think.

I wouldn’t say I’m the master of Tetris, but on the other hand, I wouldn’t say I’m terrible at it, either. I’m competent, I think is the best term you could use. You have that little pulse rate there, can’t talk too much because that’s going to…

It’s supposed to make it harder when my pulse rate is quite low, and easier when it’s high. To test that theory, I’m just going to hold my breath for a bit and slow my heartbeat down.

Now that my heartbeat is quite slow, it’s giving me very normal Tetris pieces. So far, so good. This one does have some very weird pieces for a Tetris game.

In a second, I’m going to try and make my heartbeat go higher by breathing heavily, which is going to make me look like a complete twat on video, on the internet – But this is all in the aid of science, and showing you something a little bit different.

I’m going to start breathing heavily now, to see what happens.

It’s not really doing very much to be honest. Although it’s clearly reading my heartbeat as a bit high, it’s not actually going a helluva lot, to be honest. I’m going to try and calm myself down again.

This isn’t working very well, I’m just going to try a different mode, just to see if it’s any different. So, I’m going to try B-Type.

Start off, from the beginning.

I’m just going to test a theory, I’m going to take this off, just to see if it actually changes anything. So, it looks like I’m dead, but I don’t know if this is reading it from my finger, maybe? Let’s try again.

So it’s got my pulse now.

There’s a part of me that thinks that maybe this isn’t working as it’s supposed to? I don’t think it’s a faulty unit, I think that’s working absolutely fine, I think it’s just a very low fidelity technology that doesn’t work particularly well. I think it’s picking up my voice more than my pulse at this moment.

I wonder if I put it on my finger…Might be a better place to put it.

It might not pick up my voice so much.

That looks a bit more normal.

It does actually tell you to put it on your ear, but it’s quite weird that it’s not working quite as well.

I’m going to try a different mode again, just to see if another mode works. I’m just going to start quite a high level, just to see if I can artificially make my heart beat quite high organically just by playing the game. It’s not actually working now, which is a bit weird.

There we go.

Things are moving a bit differently now, I don’t know if this is related to the pulse rate I’m going to hold my breath again just to see if this slows down.

I don’t know if you can tell whether it’s making any difference to the speed – It’s hard for me to tell. It could just be the level I’ve put it on. Again, I don’t think it’s doing much, which is quite weird.

There is a multiplayer mode on this, with up to four Bio Sensors. When you go into the Sensor Check there are other spots to have more of these on, but again – Not really much happening when you actually play the game.

Let me see what happens when you change the Bio Feedback, just to see if it’s something a little bit different.

I’m going to put the level up again to see if there’s any difference to actually playing it like this. The other thing it could be is, it depends how stressful Tetris makes you. I’m naturally a very calm person for the most part, so playing Tetris is not something I’d consider a strenuous activity, or something that would make me particularly stressful, and maybe that’s showing in this. It’s hard to tell.

I’m going to hold my breath to see if anything changes, I don’t think it is.

Honestly, I think I’m going to give up at this point, I think.Tetris 64 with a Bio Sensor is a great idea, but I don’t think the technology quite works up to the potential. I’m surprised that Nintendo haven’t come up with their little BioSensor they were talking about a few years ago for the Wii U, and this is probably why because it doesn’t work particularly well. So I’m actually going to leave it there. It’s not the most exciting video, so I’m sorry – But you can’t always trust technology, especially from the late 90’s. I’m going to leave it!

Thank you very much for watching, as always you can subscribe to this channel which is great and keeps you up to date all of the videos I do, from retro stuff to modern stuff, the random stuff to do with Bio Sensors, all that guff. And I’m going to see you around, thank you very much for watching, and don’t forget to keep gaming positive!

Retro News Round Up – December 2015

This month’s retro gaming round up contains Toki Tori, the Nintendo Playstation, Sky Skipper, and a duck wearing a bowtie.

Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ebtks
Like Retro Revisited on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RetroRevisited

This episode’s links:

More footage and images of the ‘Nintendo Playstation’:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o9ThTxiqx30
http://www.hkgolden.com/articles/article.aspx?id=20279&catid=33

More footage of Sky Skipper:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=54&v=wxeCnssDRpE

Kickstarter for Ultimate Nintendo: Guide to the NES Library:
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/560468638/nintendo-nes-library-guide-and-review-book-of-750/description

Order Legends of Localisation’s book on is The Legend of Zelda for the NES:
http://www.fangamer.com/products/legends-of-localization-zelda-book

More footage of Twelve Tales Conker 64 for the N64:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dDnvVbdEs7c

More information on GC Video for the GameCube:
http://www.videogameperfection.com/2015/11/16/hdmi-lands-gamecube/

More information on the PSIO for the Playstation:
http://ps-io.com/index.html

Download Star Chaser for the Mega Drive:
http://gendev.spritesmind.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=2132

Blaze for the Commodore Amiga:
https://keithbugeja.wordpress.com/2015/11/13/a-trip-down-video-game-memory-lane/?utf=rc&date=131115

Download demo of Sonic Team Racing for the Mega Drive:
http://gendev.spritesmind.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=1959&start=30#p27666

Buy (or not) Magnavox Odyssey title Odball:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/191733053044?rmvSB=true

Download Gunman Clive for the Game Boy:
http://www.gunmanclive.com/gameboy/

More information on Tanglewood for the Mega Drive:
http://bigevilcorporation.co.uk/2015/11/09/introducing-tanglewood-an-original-title-for-the-sega-mega-drive/

Fan translation of Onyanko Town for the NES:
http://www.romhacking.net/translations/2522/

Fan translation of Double Moon Densetsu for the NES:
http://www.romhacking.net/translations/2336/

Fan translation of Gekitotsu Yonku Battle for the NES:
http://www.romhacking.net/translations/2517/

Fan translation of Taito Chase H.Q. for the NES:
http://www.romhacking.net/translations/2516/

Fan translation of Atlantis no Nazo for the NES:
http://www.romhacking.net/translations/2526/

Fan translation of Wui Shi Hun for the NES:
http://www.romhacking.net/translations/2524/

Fan translation of Tsuri Kichi Sanpei – Blue Marlin Hen for the NES:
http://www.romhacking.net/translations/2533/

Fan translation of Wizardry Empire: Fukkatsu no Tsue for the Game Boy:
http://www.romhacking.net/translations/2322/

Retro VGM Revival Show – Launch Games

The launch of a console is something behold. Having that feeling of joy as you tear open a fresh new box and inside it an entertainment system that would completely change how you would spend your weekend. Being introduced to new exciting worlds and characters that would just be with you with just a simple push of a button. This is why that this Inaugural episode of the Retro VGM Revival Youtube Show, I thought it would be a great idea share my top 10 (in no particular order) video game Music tracks from Launch title games.

========= GAME – COMPOSER – TITLE – COMPANY ===========

NES
Donkey Kong – Yukio Kaneoka – Title BGM – Nintendo
Super Mario Bros. – Koji Kondo – Overworld Theme – Nintendo

GENESIS
Altered Beast – Tohru Nakabayashi – level theme 1 – Sega
Golden Axe – Tohru Nakabayashi, Y. “Dolphin” Takada – wilderness – Sega

SNES
Super Mario World – Koji Kondo – Overworld Theme – Nintendo
F-Zero – Yumiko Kanki , Naoto Ishida – mute city – Nintendo

GAME BOY
Super Mario Land – Hirokazu Tanaka – Ending (Rocket Ship Ride) – Nintendo

NEO GEO POCKET COLOR
King of Fighters R-2 – Unknown – Esaka (BGM 18) – SNK

SEGA DREAMCAST
Sonic Adventure – Jun Senoue, Kenichi Tokoi, Fumie Kumatani, Masaru Setsumaru – Welcome To Station Square – Sega

SEGA SATURN
Panzer Dragoon – Yoshitaka Azuma – Flight – Sega

Why Wonderland and games are the perfect match

It’s 150 years to this very day that the book Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland was first published – so to celebrate the occasion I thought I’d look at how and why the world of Wonderland works so well when used in games.

I’ve managed to get a hold of the developers behind a couple of Alice in Wonderland titles to give me their thoughts on this topic too.

And hey, why not follow me on Twitter and like Retro Revisited on Facebook?