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PugHoofGaming

I am a writer and producer of video content, currently running my YouTube channel Pug Hoof Gaming and writing for GodisaGeek. I also occasionally freelance for other outlets, such as VICE.

Warioware Inc. Retro Review (GBA)

The Warioware series has been a cult favourite since it debuted on the Game Boy Advance in 2003. Now, it’s high time for my very own Warioware Inc. GBA review, as I take on one of the weirdest games to ever grace a Nintendo console…Or any other system, for that matter.

Warioware Inc.’s initial Game Boy Advance entry is as surreal as it gets, and would setup the premise for the rest of the series – Watch, and see if this game really holds up!

Boot Sale Pickups – #3 – Cars, Cars…and Cartoons!

Once again, I’ve trawled through the mountains of useless crap and out-of-date sports games, in order to find the juiciest bargains in my local car boot sale. It’s a tough job, but someone has to do it, and luckily for you, that person is me!

Check out the games I picked up this time around, and let me know your thoughts in the comments!

Boot Sale Pickups – Guns, Choppers and Disney!

I recently visited a boot sale and picked up some real bargains on some classic (and possibly not so classic) games! I don’t really collect games like I used to, but I do like a good bargain, and it’s always an excuse to discover new games to play.

This time around, I found a classic chopper game, a game based on a popular Disney film, and a very violent shooter – You won’t believe how much money I saved over eBay prices!

London Gaming Market #2 (Sunday 3rd April, 2016)

If you may remember, back in November I attended the London Gaming Market. Well, the Market returned once again in April, so I was there, camera in hand, so see what bargains there were to be found. While I was there, I spoke to a lot of great folks and had a really good time.

Once again, the Royal National Hotel in Russell Square, London, was the venue. This time around, a lot more thought had been put into making the most of the space, making for a far more pleasant event this time around. If you love videogames or boardgames, you’ll definitely want to attend one of these markets in future!

Watch this video to see who I spoke to, and what retrogaming goodies they purchased!

The London Gaming Market returns in July, so maybe I’ll see you there!

What Does The Ryu Amiibo Do? (Amiibo Showcase)

The legendary world warrior, Ryu makes the jump from Super Smash Bros. to amiibo! Everyone’s favourite Street Fighter, Ryu is detailed in this latest Amiibo Spotlight – So what does the Ryu amiibo do? What is Ryu’s history? Does this amiibo work with Super Mario Maker?

Find out more in this video!

SNES Mouse Games – The Best (and Worst) of the Super Nintendo Peripheral

Did you know that there was more to the SNES Mouse than Mario Paint? Well, if you didn’t, this episode should be very educational for you! There’s strategy games, lightgun games – Ever DRIVING games! In this video, there’s a selection of some of the best and worst uses of this unique console peripheral.

A peripheral that should be known for more than just the “Mario Paint Mouse”, this unique SNES accessory supported a ton of games, some bad of course, some good, and some are genuinely great!

See this post (and MORE!) at PugHoofGaming.com!

Video Transcription

Thought that you could only use the SNES Mouse for Mario Paint? Think again.

There is a stigma surrounding specialised peripherals for consoles. Whether it’s the always popular lightgun, that mainstay of every self-respecting console, the infamous NES Power Glove, or even those vinyl dance mats we all purchased at one point, then banished away to the attic, cupboard, or eBay – It’s always thought that these sort of accessories start off as fun bits of plastic for your system, until you realise that what you’ve purchased is unlikely going to be supported with more than a couple of mediocre games, rendering them obsolete and worthless almost the second you unboxed them.

There is a stigma surrounding specialised peripherals for consoles. Whether it’s the always popular lightgun, that mainstay of every self-respecting console, the infamous NES Power Glove, or even those vinyl dance mats we all purchased at one point, then banished away to the attic, cupboard, or eBay – It’s always thought that these sort of accessories start off as fun bits of plastic for your system, until you realise that what you’ve purchased is unlikely going to be supported with more than a couple of mediocre games, rendering them obsolete and worthless almost the second you unboxed them.And so, the SNES Mouse appeared to have suffered that very same fate. Released in 1992 for the Super Nintendo, this very old-fashioned, ball-driven mouse mimicked the very same devices that were available for the PC at the time. Of course, while the humble mouse quickly became an integral part of the computer user interface, there was no way that a mouse for a console would be anything more than a gimmick.

And so, the SNES Mouse appeared to have suffered that very same fate. Released in 1992 for the Super Nintendo, this very old-fashioned, ball-driven mouse mimicked the very same devices that were available for the PC at the time. Of course, while the humble mouse quickly became an integral part of the computer user interface, there was no way that a mouse for a console would be anything more than a gimmick.But while the mouse itself was forgotten, its legacy continued with the game it was bundled with: Mario Paint. This creative suite of sorts continues to have a strong following over twenty years after its release, and it’s easy to see why, thanks to its child friendly, simplistic nature. Players of all ages could use the SNES mouse to draw simple pictures, animate them and even create short pieces of music using a pre-defined set of instruments.

But while the mouse itself was forgotten, its legacy continued with the game it was bundled with: Mario Paint. This creative suite of sorts continues to have a strong following over twenty years after its release, and it’s easy to see why, thanks to its child friendly, simplistic nature. Players of all ages could use the SNES mouse to draw simple pictures, animate them and even create short pieces of music using a pre-defined set of instruments.While it was never going to be as powerful as computer art packages, the fact that you could do all this on a console made it all the more popular. While you couldn’t print your creations out and saving your work was very limited, Mario Paint did come with instructions, showing you how to connect your SNES to a VHS recorder to save your footage forevermore. Even the web cartoon Homestar Runner started life as a simple looping Mario Paint creation, years before the advent of Flash animation.While it was never going to be as powerful as computer art packages, the fact that you could do all this on a console made it all the more popular. While you couldn’t print your creations out and saving your work was very limited, Mario Paint did come with instructions, showing you how to connect your SNES to a VHS recorder to save your footage forevermore. Even the web cartoon Homestar Runner started life as a simple looping Mario Paint creation, years before the advent of Flash animation.

While it was never going to be as powerful as computer art packages, the fact that you could do all this on a console made it all the more popular. While you couldn’t print your creations out and saving your work was very limited, Mario Paint did come with instructions, showing you how to connect your SNES to a VHS recorder to save your footage forevermore. Even the web cartoon Homestar Runner started life as a simple looping Mario Paint creation, years before the advent of Flash animation.It’s the music creation segment of Mario Paint that’s had the most endearing legacy, especially in the age of YouTube, as thousands of videos exist of user-created covers of popular songs and themes, just using Mario Paint’s limited tools for music creation. You pick a sound, place where you want it to go and what pitch you want it to be, and before you know it – You’re making music. Press play, and you see a little Mario running over your composition, triggering the sounds as he jumps on each icon.

It’s the music creation segment of Mario Paint that’s had the most endearing legacy, especially in the age of YouTube, as thousands of videos exist of user-created covers of popular songs and themes, just using Mario Paint’s limited tools for music creation. You pick a sound, place where you want it to go and what pitch you want it to be, and before you know it – You’re making music. Press play, and you see a little Mario running over your composition, triggering the sounds as he jumps on each icon.Of course, if all of this creativity is beginning to feel like hard work and you want a break, you could always play the fly swatting mini-game for a few minutes or more.

Of course, if all of this creativity is beginning to feel like hard work and you want a break, you could always play the fly swatting mini-game for a few minutes or more.While there was never a true sequel to Mario Paint, save for an updated version of the game that had controller support and was only available on the Japanese-only Satellaview broadcast system, its DNA can be found in many games after. The elusive 64DD addon for Nintendo 64 had a series of creative software packages called Mario Artist, where players could do everything from paint pictures in Paint Studio, animate 3D models and even import their own face onto characters using Talent Studio, edit simplistic 3D models using Polygon Studio, and then share all of these creations online using the Mario Artist Communication Kit. Various elements of Mario Paint also make brief cameos in some of the WarioWare titles, as some of the crazy mini-games you’d have to play. Of course, even the recent Super Mario Maker features many of the graphics and icons from Mario Paint, proving that this cartridge’s influence is still very strong among Nintendo developers.

While there was never a true sequel to Mario Paint, save for an updated version of the game that had controller support and was only available on the Japanese-only Satellaview broadcast system, its DNA can be found in many games after. The elusive 64DD addon for Nintendo 64 had a series of creative software packages called Mario Artist, where players could do everything from paint pictures in Paint Studio, animate 3D models and even import their own face onto characters using Talent Studio, edit simplistic 3D models using Polygon Studio, and then share all of these creations online using the Mario Artist Communication Kit. Various elements of Mario Paint also make brief cameos in some of the WarioWare titles, as some of the crazy mini-games you’d have to play. Of course, even the recent Super Mario Maker features many of the graphics and icons from Mario Paint, proving that this cartridge’s influence is still very strong among Nintendo developers.Most people thought that Mario Paint was the only game to support the SNES Mouse. It may surprise you to learn that over 60 games had some sort of SNES Mouse support, and some titles used this peripheral in some of the weirdest ways. While many of these titles were Japanese-only, there was a considerable amount available in the West. I’m going to show you some of the more notable games out there, but note that this is far from all of the games that support this addon.First up is the sequel to classic bat and ball brick buster, Arkanoid. Doh It Again follows the very same gameplay from the arcade original, except it’s now on the SNES, and while it plays perfectly well using a controller, it’s a slightly different experience using a mouse.

Most people thought that Mario Paint was the only game to support the SNES Mouse. It may surprise you to learn that over 60 games had some sort of SNES Mouse support, and some titles used this peripheral in some of the weirdest ways. While many of these titles were Japanese-only, there was a considerable amount available in the West. I’m going to show you some of the more notable games out there, but note that this is far from all of the games that support this addon.First up is the sequel to classic bat and ball brick buster, Arkanoid. Doh It Again follows the very same gameplay from the arcade original, except it’s now on the SNES, and while it plays perfectly well using a controller, it’s a slightly different experience using a mouse.First up is the sequel to classic bat and ball brick buster, Arkanoid. Doh It Again follows the very same gameplay from the arcade original, except it’s now on the SNES, and while it plays perfectly well using a controller, it’s a slightly different experience using a mouse.

First up is the sequel to classic bat and ball brick buster, Arkanoid. Doh It Again follows the very same gameplay from the arcade original, except it’s now on the SNES, and while it plays perfectly well using a controller, it’s a slightly different experience using a mouse.
For those who have never played Arkanoid or the original brick breaking game, Breakout, you have a bat at the bottom of the screen which you move side to side, and a ball that rebounds off of any surface. You need to stop the ball falling below your bat, while also hitting all of the breakable bricks in the area. Arkanoid took this gameplay mechanic a little further, adding a host of powerups to help or hinder your destruction.While it’s not a patch on the original arcade machine’s paddle controller, the SNES mouse is a unique alternative which does give you a little control over the speed and acceleration, although, like most games usually played with a controller, it does take a little bit of getting used to.

While it’s not a patch on the original arcade machine’s paddle controller, the SNES mouse is a unique alternative which does give you a little control over the speed and acceleration, although, like most games usually played with a controller, it does take a little bit of getting used to.If you’re bored of Mario Paint for some reason and want a suitable alternative, the Looney Toons ACME Animation Studio might be worth a look. Featuring Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig and tons more of those wacky Looney Toons, this cartridge offers similar functionality to Mario Paint, with a few other options and some added cartoon wackiness.

If you’re bored of Mario Paint for some reason and want a suitable alternative, the Looney Toons ACME Animation Studio might be worth a look. Featuring Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig and tons more of those wacky Looney Toons, this cartridge offers similar functionality to Mario Paint, with a few other options and some added cartoon wackiness.

You can draw, make music, colour in Looney Toons, and even use them to make short and extremely limited cartoons. There’s even a match two pairs mini-game if you’re really bored. Actually, it’s quite like Mario Paint, but this package has a little more depth and complexity in what you can do with it.Amiga megahit Cannon Fodder was made with a mouse in mind, so it comes as no surprise to learn that the SNES port not only contains support for the SNES mouse, but it’s the best way to play the game.

Amiga megahit Cannon Fodder was made with a mouse in mind, so it comes as no surprise to learn that the SNES port not only contains support for the SNES mouse, but it’s the best way to play the game.
This slightly comical take on war is simplistic enough to play solely with the two-buttoned mouse, and that’s why it works so well. Being able to quickly and accurately place the cursor for movement and shooting is so much more preferable than clumsily moving it around with the standard dpad, so this a game that’s definitely worth checking out.standard dpad, so this a game that’s definitely worth checking out.Sid Meier’s Civilization somehow made it to the SNES, and as always it’s a fantastic strategy game that has stood the test of time. Building up a global empire from nothing will never stop being an engaging endeavour, and I spent many an hour playing this game in my teen years.

Sid Meier’s Civilization somehow made it to the SNES, and as always it’s a fantastic strategy game that has stood the test of time. Building up a global empire from nothing will never stop being an engaging endeavour, and I spent many an hour playing this game in my teen years.
While playing with the standard controller is reasonably easy, once again this is the sort of game that the mouse was made for, if only because there’s a lot of clicking buttons, units and other icons. This is one of those rare PC to console ports that actually works.Onto the drivel. Fun & Games is a very barebones package that is nothing more than a very pale Mario Paint ripoff, featuring none of the depth or competence that Nintendo’s game features. This cartridge features two very hard to control games, one being an awful Pac-Man ripoff, the other a dull space shooter. There’s a terrible paint package that isn’t a patch on Mario Paint, an awful-sounding music maker, and for some reason, a weird mode where you play dress up by cycling through different items of clothing and accessories.

Onto the drivel. Fun & Games is a very barebones package that is nothing more than a very pale Mario Paint ripoff, featuring none of the depth or competence that Nintendo’s game features. This cartridge features two very hard to control games, one being an awful Pac-Man ripoff, the other a dull space shooter. There’s a terrible paint package that isn’t a patch on Mario Paint, an awful-sounding music maker, and for some reason, a weird mode where you play dress up by cycling through different items of clothing and accessories.With Mario Paint and the Acme Animation Studio already available, I see no need for anyone to pick up this awful game. Still, at least the mouse works.

With Mario Paint and the Acme Animation Studio already available, I see no need for anyone to pick up this awful game. Still, at least the mouse works.Unlike Revolution X, a port of the hit arcade lightgun shooter featuring those aging rockers, Aerosmith. As a lightgun game, you would think that adding mouse support would make sense, so luckily Revolution X happily offers this to you. However, they also made the same button for firing your gun and pausing, so every time you press the fire button to shoot an enemy, the game pauses. The only way to get around this is to hold the fire button down, which is just irritating.

Unlike Revolution X, a port of the hit arcade lightgun shooter featuring those aging rockers, Aerosmith. As a lightgun game, you would think that adding mouse support would make sense, so luckily Revolution X happily offers this to you. However, they also made the same button for firing your gun and pausing, so every time you press the fire button to shoot an enemy, the game pauses. The only way to get around this is to hold the fire button down, which is just irritating.This isn’t the best lightgun game around in the first place, and with no mention of mouse support in the manual or box, I do wonder if the ability to use the SNES Mouse was fully implemented or even intended. It’s just a missed opportunity really.

This isn’t the best lightgun game around in the first place, and with no mention of mouse support in the manual or box, I do wonder if the ability to use the SNES Mouse was fully implemented or even intended. It’s just a missed opportunity really.Way before Peter Jackson gave us his cinematic take on Tolkien’s literary classic, Interplay brought the first of a planned series of games based on The Lord of The Rings, to the Super Nintendo. This slow-paced RPG didn’t exactly set the world on fire, hence this was the only game in the series.

Way before Peter Jackson gave us his cinematic take on Tolkien’s literary classic, Interplay brought the first of a planned series of games based on The Lord of The Rings, to the Super Nintendo. This slow-paced RPG didn’t exactly set the world on fire, hence this was the only game in the series.As for mouse controls, this is the type of game that doesn’t work at all with a cursor. As you have direct control of Frodo, it makes far more sense to use a standard controller, and attempting to use the mouse is an incredibly cumbersome and frustrating experience. Probably not the greatest use of the peripheral.

As for mouse controls, this is the type of game that doesn’t work at all with a cursor. As you have direct control of Frodo, it makes far more sense to use a standard controller, and attempting to use the mouse is an incredibly cumbersome and frustrating experience. Probably not the greatest use of the peripheral.Unsurprisingly, strategy games seem to be best suited for the SNES mouse, and King Arthur’s World is a good example of this. Reminiscent of the Lemmings series of games, this medieval-themed release puts you in charge of an army, using various different types of units to reach the end of several side-scrolling levels, taking on various enemies along the way, and making the most of each unit’s abilities to survive a number of hazards.

Unsurprisingly, strategy games seem to be best suited for the SNES mouse, and King Arthur’s World is a good example of this. Reminiscent of the Lemmings series of games, this medieval-themed release puts you in charge of an army, using various different types of units to reach the end of several side-scrolling levels, taking on various enemies along the way, and making the most of each unit’s abilities to survive a number of hazards.It works well with the SNES mouse, and it’s worth noting that this is one of the first SNES games that offers Dolby Pro Logic surround sound, which gives an immersive audio soundtrack from the console’s stereo output.

It works well with the SNES mouse, and it’s worth noting that this is one of the first SNES games that offers Dolby Pro Logic surround sound, which gives an immersive audio soundtrack from the console’s stereo output.
Funnily enough, this next game also features Dolby Pro Logic and SNES Mouse support, and it is Ocean’s licensed game based on 1993’s massively successful Jurassic Park. Differing from the side-scrolling platformers on other systems, this game starts off with a top-down view for the most part, but when entering buildings, it shifts to a first-person view. While the game is mostly controlled with standard pad, in these first-person areas, the SNES Mouse can be used.While this game doesn’t do a great job at telling you what you need to do next, it’s a refreshing change from the usual uninspired licensed games of the 16-bit era. It’s a little cumbersome to use the SNES mouse, as it’s far easier just to use to pad for everything. However, it’s good to see a developer think a little outside of the box when it comes to supporting alternative control methods for a console game.

While this game doesn’t do a great job at telling you what you need to do next, it’s a refreshing change from the usual uninspired licensed games of the 16-bit era. It’s a little cumbersome to use the SNES mouse, as it’s far easier just to use to pad for everything. However, it’s good to see a developer think a little outside of the box when it comes to supporting alternative control methods for a console game.We now come to one of the weirdest uses of a mouse I’ve ever seen. For some reason, someone decided that a racing game would be a good fit for the SNES Mouse, and the result is Lamborghini American Challenge. Somehow, it sort of works, although it’s no comparison for using a normal controller.

We now come to one of the weirdest uses of a mouse I’ve ever seen. For some reason, someone decided that a racing game would be a good fit for the SNES Mouse, and the result is Lamborghini American Challenge. Somehow, it sort of works, although it’s no comparison for using a normal controller.Using the mouse in this fashion is like using a primitive analog controller, as the further you move the mouse, the more you steer. The problem is that unlike using a pad, the steering doesn’t spring back to the center position when you stop steering, which means that you’re constantly swinging the mouse around to center yourself. Still, it’s another unique use for the peripheral.

Using the mouse in this fashion is like using a primitive analog controller, as the further you move the mouse, the more you steer. The problem is that unlike using a pad, the steering doesn’t spring back to the center position when you stop steering, which means that you’re constantly swinging the mouse around to center yourself. Still, it’s another unique use for the peripheral.If ever there was a game made for the mouse, it’s Lemmings 2: The Tribes. Surely you must know what Lemmings is all about – In this strategy game, it’s all about assigning jobs to a group of suicidal rodents so they reach the end of each level, instead of aimlessly wandering to their doom.This time around, you’re dealing with Lemmings of different tribes, which means there are several different themed abilities available, making for a far more complex game than the original. As you imagine, Lemmings was designed with a mouse in mind, so playing the SNES version with the correct peripheral is the definitive way to play this port.

If ever there was a game made for the mouse, it’s Lemmings 2: The Tribes. Surely you must know what Lemmings is all about – In this strategy game, it’s all about assigning jobs to a group of suicidal rodents so they reach the end of each level, instead of aimlessly wandering to their doom.This time around, you’re dealing with Lemmings of different tribes, which means there are several different themed abilities available, making for a far more complex game than the original. As you imagine, Lemmings was designed with a mouse in mind, so playing the SNES version with the correct peripheral is the definitive way to play this port.

This time around, you’re dealing with Lemmings of different tribes, which means there are several different themed abilities available, making for a far more complex game than the original. As you imagine, Lemmings was designed with a mouse in mind, so playing the SNES version with the correct peripheral is the definitive way to play this port.My favourite game to support the SNES mouse, strangely didn’t even make it out of Japan. Mario & Wario is a point-and-click puzzle action game where where Mario has been rendered blind by having a bucket stuck to his noggin. It’s up to you to ensure Mario completes each level safely by clicking dotted areas to build paths, clicking enemies to clear those paths, and click Mario himself to change the direction he’s walking in. It’s the simplest of puzzle games, and that’s why it works so well.

My favourite game to support the SNES mouse, strangely didn’t even make it out of Japan. Mario & Wario is a point-and-click puzzle action game where Mario has been rendered blind by having a bucket stuck to his noggin. It’s up to you to ensure Mario completes each level safely by clicking dotted areas to build paths, clicking enemies to clear those paths, and click Mario himself to change the direction he’s walking in. It’s the simplest of puzzle games, and that’s why it works so well.Why it wasn’t released outside of Japan, I don’t know, but it’s worth a look, especially as no knowledge of the Japanese language is necessary.

Why it wasn’t released outside of Japan, I don’t know, but it’s worth a look, especially as no knowledge of the Japanese language is necessary.
Yet another Japan-only release is Mario no Super Picross, the 16-bit rendition of the Picross series plays very similar to the Game Boy’s Mario’s Picross, albeit with a few different puzzles. You’re given a grid, and outside of this grid are some numbers that indicate how many grid squares you need to chip away in a row or column. Break away the right squares before the generous time limit runs out, and you’ll end up with a picture. Chip away the wrong squares however, and you’ll incur a time penalty.This is the type of game that should work with a mouse, but I found myself clicking the wrong squares more than I would have liked. I actually found that using the pad gave me a little more control, stopping me from making silly mistakes and losing time.

This is the type of game that should work with a mouse, but I found myself clicking the wrong squares more than I would have liked. I actually found that using the pad gave me a little more control, stopping me from making silly mistakes and losing time. Picross is always great, but this is one version that is more than adequate with the standard pad.Terminator 2: The Arcade Game was one of the more popular arcade lightgun shooters of the early 90’s, and the SNES version was a very good port, and also gave you the option of using the controller, Super Scope lightgun and of course, the SNES mouse. As for the game, it’s your standard lightgun shooter, putting you in the role of a Terminator programmed to stop Skynet from starting Judgement Day.

Terminator 2: The Arcade Game was one of the more popular arcade lightgun shooters of the early 90’s, and the SNES version was a very good port, and also gave you the option of using the controller, Super Scope lightgun and of course, the SNES mouse. As for the game, it’s your standard lightgun shooter, putting you in the role of a Terminator programmed to stop Skynet from starting Judgement Day.Unlike Revolution X, the mouse option actually works, and works very well. You’d probably want to use the Super Scope for this arcade port, but considering that you need an old school CRT television to play with a lightgun, the mouse is a decent alternative.

Unlike Revolution X, the mouse option actually works, and works very well. You’d probably want to use the Super Scope for this arcade port, but considering that you need an old school CRT television to play with a lightgun, the mouse is a decent alternative.Tin Star is a forgotten SNES gem, mixing a Wild West theme with robots. An original game built from the ground up to support the standard pad, Super Scope and SNES Mouse, you play as the eponymous sheriff, Tin Star, and it’s up to you and your skill with firearms to save the day from the Black Oil Gang and their leader, Black Bart. Taking place in various different types of levels, from canteen shootouts to tense duals, it’s quirky, bright and fun, with a sense of humour that elevates it from a lot of lightgun-style games.

Tin Star is a forgotten SNES gem, mixing a Wild West theme with robots. An original game built from the ground up to support the standard pad, Super Scope and SNES Mouse, you play as the eponymous sheriff, Tin Star, and it’s up to you and your skill with firearms to save the day from the Black Oil Gang and their leader, Black Bart. Taking place in various different types of levels, from canteen shootouts to tense duals, it’s quirky, bright and fun, with a sense of humour that elevates it from a lot of lightgun-style games.

If violence is what you’re after, this port of PC classic Wolfenstein 3D should keep your trigger finger satisfied. While it’s lacking the Nazi paraphernalia of the original, as well as a bunch of other content that has been censored, such as blood, it’s a decent console port, although using the mouse isn’t quite the same without access to a keyboard. You might want to stick with the controller for this version, although it might just be best to stick with the PC version altogether.

Finally, you can’t talk about the SNES version of Wolfenstein 3D without talking of Super 3D Noah’s Ark. This unlicensed SNES game from Christian developers Wisdom Tree is built from Wolfenstein’s engine and in fact this was licensed from id Software themselves. As such, the mouse support remains and the game plays exactly like id’s original game, only instead of shooting enemies, you’re firing sedative-packed food at animals using a slingshot, in a bit to make them sleepy.

So that was a hefty chunk of games that use the SNES Mouse. It’s not all of them, but it’s certainly the more notable and playable titles for the most part. Hopefully, you found this video enlightening and that you now have a greater appreciation for this interesting and rarely-spoken about SNES peripheral.

Super Game Boy Special!

Move over NX, the Super Game Boy has been letting us take takes out on a portable, and play them on a television for two decades now! But did you also know about the Japan-only Super Game Boy 2, or Hori’s special Game Boy Commander gamepad, made especially for the Super Game Boy?

Watch this video and find out more about these awesome pieces of hardware, and see that the Super Game Boy wasn’t just about playing Game Boy games on the television – In fact, it added a lot more functionality than that!

Video Transcription

Who needs the NX when you can play Game Boy games on the big screen!

95% of Nintendo related chatter these days is gravitating towards their next console, the Nintendo NX. Supposedly the hybrid of home console and portable system, the possibilities are tantalising. Being able to take games out with you on a portable system and then take them back home and play on the television is an excellent evolution of what the Nintendo Wii U offered with its GamePad.

However, you’ve been able to do something very similar all along, with Nintendo’s very own Super Game Boy!

Released in 1994, the Super Game Boy was a nifty little device that let you play Game Boy cartridges on a television, via a Super Nintendo console. It’s design is simple – Plug your Game Boy game into the Super Game Boy, slide the whole lot into your SNES cartridge slot, turn the power on and away you go. The device itself was basically the Game Boy hardware in a cartridge, so it wasn’t just simple software emulation, it was as authentic as it got – Apart from the the fact that the Super Game Boy ran games ever so slightly faster than the original hardware.

But it was a great piece of kit, that also had a few other tricks up its sleeve. For a start, you can play games with palette other than the Game Boy’s trademark green hues. You can choose from a number of pre-made palettes, or even make your own, while some older Game Boy titles even had their own preset palettes that would be loaded instantly, such as Super Mario Land and Metroid II: Return of Samus.

A number of borders were also available that surrounded the virtual Game Boy screen, with some specific games even containing their own specific borders, such as the Pokemon series, and of course you could draw your own, and you could even use a SNES mouse if you have one.

If that wasn’t all, several Super Game Boy-enabled games had bonus options – Wario Blast allowed four players to play on the Super Game Boy with one cartridge via a multi-tap, while Street Fighter 2 enabled 2 players with just one copy of the game. Some games had better music and sound effects, while Space Invaders contained a proper 16-bit version of the game on its tiny cartridge.

The Super Game Boy eventually got even better, because Japan got a second revision of the hardware. The Super Game Boy 2 arrived in 1998 and is absolutely lovely to look at, with it’s transparent blue casing and LED power light. It added a link cable socket, perfect for playing multiplayer games or more specifically, allowing for trades and battles in Pokemon. It also added 8 new borders, including my personal favourite – One that mimics the transparent Game Boys that were released later on, so you can see a pixel rendition of the system’s innards. It also fixed the speed issues that I mentioned earlier, making for an even more authentic experience.

But wait, that’s not all all – Because, there’s only one way to truly experience the Super Game Boy and that’s to use Hori’s official Super Game Boy Commander gamepad. This special controller looks just like the Game Boy’s nether regions, containing an almost identical design, albeit with extra buttons. Not only does this pad make for a more enjoyable Game Boy experience, but it also makes navigating the Super Game Boy’s menus that little easier, with specially labelled buttons for menu functions. It also places all the shoulder buttons to the face of the pad, which has its uses for other SNES games.This is truly one of the best ways to play Game Boy games on your television, except maybe the Game Boy Player, which is another story for another time.

Thank you so much for taking the time to watch this video, and I hope you found it enlightening. As always, subscribes, comments and shares are always appreciated – I always reply to all comments, as well as Tweets to @PugHoofGaming. If you liked this video, there’s plenty more great content on my channel, so why not check out my other videos?

As always – until next time, keep gaming positive.

See The Tetris 64 Bio Sensor In Action!

Did you know there was a Nintendo 64 peripheral that took your pulse, and only worked with the Japan-only Tetris 64? It’s the Tetris 64 Bio Sensor!

Well watch this video, and not only will you know more, but you’ll actually SEE me play Bio Tetris while having my pulse taken. What does this all mean?

Watch and find out!

Video Transcription

I’m going to try and make my heartbeat go higher, by breathing heavily which is going to make me look like a complete twat.

So for the last two weeks, I’ve been talking about some of the pickups I’ve purchased from the London Gaming Market and this is the final video that I’m going to use to talk about that, and the reason why is that I thought I’d make a special video just for one particular item I purchased the other week and that is this little guy here and I’ve referred to is as a biosensor because that is basically what it is. This is a Japanese-only peripheral that only came out in Japan and was only released and used for one game in particular, and that is Tetris 64. I thought, since no-one really knows too much about these things, it would be the perfect opportunity to show you something that not many people have seen – Someone actually playing Tetris 64 using the Bio Sensor, to see how it works, so I’ve got my N64 pad here and we’re just going to plug this bad boy in. Then, I’m going to clip this little thing to me ear here so it can take my pulse – It’s quite difficult to actually keep it on, it’s not very tight which is good in some ways, but I’m worried it’ll fall off a bit.

I’m going to start the game, and then see what we’ve got. We’ve got all sorts of different modes, luckily the menu is in English! So there’s a Sensor Check option, just to make sure it’s all working, so it’s taking my pulse – I don’t know if that’s good or not; 90 to 100. That’s probably normal, I guess. Hopefully. I don’t know if that actually changes depending on me talking as well, so lets see if that works.

There’s a Bio Tetris mode, and I haven’t actually properly played this yet, so I’m not sure what to expect. It’s my understanding that when I play this game, it’ll take my pulse and it will change the difficulty the game speed accordingly. So I’m going to start off on level 3, I think.

I wouldn’t say I’m the master of Tetris, but on the other hand, I wouldn’t say I’m terrible at it, either. I’m competent, I think is the best term you could use. You have that little pulse rate there, can’t talk too much because that’s going to…

It’s supposed to make it harder when my pulse rate is quite low, and easier when it’s high. To test that theory, I’m just going to hold my breath for a bit and slow my heartbeat down.

Now that my heartbeat is quite slow, it’s giving me very normal Tetris pieces. So far, so good. This one does have some very weird pieces for a Tetris game.

In a second, I’m going to try and make my heartbeat go higher by breathing heavily, which is going to make me look like a complete twat on video, on the internet – But this is all in the aid of science, and showing you something a little bit different.

I’m going to start breathing heavily now, to see what happens.

It’s not really doing very much to be honest. Although it’s clearly reading my heartbeat as a bit high, it’s not actually going a helluva lot, to be honest. I’m going to try and calm myself down again.

This isn’t working very well, I’m just going to try a different mode, just to see if it’s any different. So, I’m going to try B-Type.

Start off, from the beginning.

I’m just going to test a theory, I’m going to take this off, just to see if it actually changes anything. So, it looks like I’m dead, but I don’t know if this is reading it from my finger, maybe? Let’s try again.

So it’s got my pulse now.

There’s a part of me that thinks that maybe this isn’t working as it’s supposed to? I don’t think it’s a faulty unit, I think that’s working absolutely fine, I think it’s just a very low fidelity technology that doesn’t work particularly well. I think it’s picking up my voice more than my pulse at this moment.

I wonder if I put it on my finger…Might be a better place to put it.

It might not pick up my voice so much.

That looks a bit more normal.

It does actually tell you to put it on your ear, but it’s quite weird that it’s not working quite as well.

I’m going to try a different mode again, just to see if another mode works. I’m just going to start quite a high level, just to see if I can artificially make my heart beat quite high organically just by playing the game. It’s not actually working now, which is a bit weird.

There we go.

Things are moving a bit differently now, I don’t know if this is related to the pulse rate I’m going to hold my breath again just to see if this slows down.

I don’t know if you can tell whether it’s making any difference to the speed – It’s hard for me to tell. It could just be the level I’ve put it on. Again, I don’t think it’s doing much, which is quite weird.

There is a multiplayer mode on this, with up to four Bio Sensors. When you go into the Sensor Check there are other spots to have more of these on, but again – Not really much happening when you actually play the game.

Let me see what happens when you change the Bio Feedback, just to see if it’s something a little bit different.

I’m going to put the level up again to see if there’s any difference to actually playing it like this. The other thing it could be is, it depends how stressful Tetris makes you. I’m naturally a very calm person for the most part, so playing Tetris is not something I’d consider a strenuous activity, or something that would make me particularly stressful, and maybe that’s showing in this. It’s hard to tell.

I’m going to hold my breath to see if anything changes, I don’t think it is.

Honestly, I think I’m going to give up at this point, I think.Tetris 64 with a Bio Sensor is a great idea, but I don’t think the technology quite works up to the potential. I’m surprised that Nintendo haven’t come up with their little BioSensor they were talking about a few years ago for the Wii U, and this is probably why because it doesn’t work particularly well. So I’m actually going to leave it there. It’s not the most exciting video, so I’m sorry – But you can’t always trust technology, especially from the late 90’s. I’m going to leave it!

Thank you very much for watching, as always you can subscribe to this channel which is great and keeps you up to date all of the videos I do, from retro stuff to modern stuff, the random stuff to do with Bio Sensors, all that guff. And I’m going to see you around, thank you very much for watching, and don’t forget to keep gaming positive!

At The London Gaming Market

The first of its kind in the area, the London Gaming Market came to the capital on Sunday November 15th, containing tons of sellers related to gaming and board games, as well as a lot of eager folk trying to grab a good bargain.

I was there for this inaugural event, and as well as picking up a few bargains (which you’ll see in a future video), I also had a chat with console modder Retrospective22, and the editor of fanzine Hyper Play!

You can see (and buy) more of Retrospective22’s work at http://www.retrospective22.com

Buy your copy of Hyper Play from http://www.hyperplayrpg.com

Video Transcription:

This is Pug Hoof Gaming, and we are at the London Gaming Market!

On Sunday, 15th November, the Royal National Hotel hosted London’s first Gaming Market. The first of its kind to take place in London, this event featured a whole host of games traders, ready to sell their wares to an eager bunch of collectors and gamers alike.

With the organisers at Replay Events, Showmasters and Dark Cleo Productions planning to host one of these events every four months, I just had to be there at the very first one, to see what the fuss was all about. It was also a great opportunity to chat with friends old and new, as well as talk to some of the market vendors themselves. One of the highlights for me personally was a stall belonging to Retrospective22, a seller of cosmetically modified retro systems that impressed me with their creativity.

So we’ve got games, and we’ve also got hardware, we’ve also got some specially modified consoles by this man here. What’s your business name?

Retrospective 22.

So, I’ve seen you do quite a lot of different modding stuff, do you mod any console?

Yeah, we’ll give it a go, but I like to do the retro ones mainly, customise them and theme them on pop culture things.

Is it just cosmetics you do, or do you do a bit of the functional stuff, like lighting.

There’s a few things we do, like the DMGs, in NESes we do the region mod. But I like doing the paints, on the Gamecubes.

You’ve got some really nice Gamecubes over there, very subtle, single colours, double colours really with an insignia over the top – They’re really nice – I’ll put them in the video i na second so you guys can actually see. Actually, we’ve got one here that’s just been handed over to me. As you can see, very simple, really nice little look for that there, very stencilly.

So with this one, I was kind of inspired by the N64, the Pokemon one.

Yeah of course!

So it was the yellow and the blue. When I do a custom job on a console, I try to keep it as original as possible, because I think you can either go two ways with a custom job. You can overdo it and it’ll look a bit tacky, or you can try to keep it as original as possible, and make it a better finish.

There’s definitely a very nice finish to those consoles, you wouldn’t even know they were painted, to your credit it’s a good way of doing that. Is the Gamecube your favourite console to to a paintjob on?

Yeah, I enjoy doing painting the Gamecubes, but my favourite console of all time is the SNES, that’s the only one I collect

I can’t really argue with a man that picks SNES as his favourite – A man after my own heart here! You can’t go wrong with a nicely modded SNES. You’ve got some Legend of Zelda ones over there, an Iron Man Mega Drive – You’ve got everything here! A great variety of pop culture favourites here. Very nice, a different approach, and not just video game focused, but pop cultury stuff as well, which is very different. It stands out from a mile away – If you saw it from the other end of this room (If you could see, because it’s so busy here!), you’d actually see them from quite a way away.

I really love these, what’s your website link? Twitter? Tell the guys!

It’s Retrospective22, Retrospective22.com on Facebook it’s the same, and Instagram as well. We’re not on Twitter yet, but I think we’re going to have to do that.

You gotta go on Twitter! We’re on Twitter. Thank you very much for taking the time to chat, and have I hope you have a good day!

Board games also had quite a big presence, with tons of the games for sale at some stalls, with a few tables set up with some demonstrations of some of the cooler games. As someone who’s recently been playing more board games, it was great to actually see some of these games in action. While it started off as the quieter room or the event, it certainly filled up a bit later on!

It’s about ten to twelve, so it’s been open for only 50 minutes, but it’s absolutely busy here!

With so many attendees in such a small space, it wasn’t easy even getting to some of the stalls. Thankfully, everyone else seemed to be polite enough to step aside if you asked nicely, but you definitely had to be quick in order to grab those bargains. My wife was looking for a PS1 copy of Parappa The Rapper, but unfortunately, someone had already got the one available copy first. Despite this minor setback, I still managed to pick up a few real bargains myself!

But it wasn’t just about buying video games or board games, as there was a good sense of community throughout the two rooms of the Royal National Hotel, as well as something I hadn’t seen in quite a while – A homemade fanzine for sale! I had a chat with the creators to find out more.

So, what started Hyper Play?

Well, I was looking for a fanzine online, something which was all about Nintendo and retro games, but I couldn’t find one in print, obviously there’s stuff on the web. I thought, maybe something to enjoy away from the screen, at the end of the day, also all the Nintendo magazines were closing and I thought “well, why not do my own?”, so here we have Hyper Play RPG. It’s mostly RPGs, but also Nintendo of any era as well. Trying to bring back the love.

So it’s mainly JRPGs at the moment, any other import stuff as well as JRPGs?

Absolutely!

It sounds very interesting actually, it’s very interesting to do something in print these days, as everything is digital, ebooks, PDFs.

It’s the retro love, really.

It’s a classic black and white, can we have a quick flick through to show everyone? So it’s all black and white, text.

Plenty of content.

It’s very old school, you can’t get any more retro than a black and white fanzine print. It’s actually quite impressive, I’ve had a quick flick through after I bought my copy just now – So this is issue nought? When it issue 1 coming out?

Issue 1 is coming this month, maybe December – But it’s coming. On the back, we do a preview, Xenoblade Chronicles – Knights of the Old Republic, and a couple of other retro games as well.

So if you want to get a copy of this for themselves?

Well, it’s online, we’ve got out own website – HyperPlayRPG.com, and you can also get it on eBay where you can pay what you like for it.

I can’t say fairer than that! How about Twitter?

Yes on Twitter @HyperplayRP, so we’re on that.

Excellent, thank you very much! Check out Hyper Play, it’s very good so far, if you like retro, SNES and JRPGs it’ll be right up your street.

So that was the London Gaming Market, it’s been a pretty good day, a really nice turnout. It’s so nice to see so many people celebrating the world of retro gaming, modern gaming and of board games of course. Lots of bargains to be had here, I did pick up a few things – I’m not going to show you what they are, I think I’m going to save them for another video. I met a load of great people, it’s been a wonderful time and hopefully this will be the first of many London Gaming Market video from events like this in future. Thank you very much for watching, as always you can subscribe to us, which does me a favour and also keeps you up to date with all the latest videos we’ve got. You can follow me on Twitter @PugHoofGaming and keep up to date with all the stuff I’m doing, all the places I’m going, the people I’m meeting and blah blah blah!

Just keep on watching our videos, share subscribe, like, all that good stuff. Thank you very much for watching and until next time – Keep Gaming Positive!

What Zelda Game Should I Play First?

A question I get asked quite a lot is from those that have somehow never played a Zelda game before. Yes, there are quite a few of you that have, for one reason or another, never indulged in the delights of wielding the Master Sword, exploring the world of Hyrule, or defeating Ganon.

But, you know it’s never too late. With Twilight Princess HD on the way and the Wii U Zelda game hopefully coming our way in 2016 – Now is the perfect time to brush up on your swordplay. Because I’m so lovely and nice, I did a little video a while ago, with my opinion on what games you newcomers should play to get a handle on why so many people love this series. Watch, enjoy, and subscribe to PugHoofGaming for more videos, just like this one!

Meet Zelda: Wind Waker’s REAL Hero – Salvatore!

Games tend to have heroes. Everyday folk who find a magical sword or some other McGuffin. The knight in shining armour. The plumber in white gloves. Yes, heroes are a gaming staple, and we celebrate this extraodinary folk for allowing us to indulge in every single power fantasy we could ever think of.

But what of those who don’t have the Master Sword, a plasma rifle or mushrooms? A hero doesn’t necessarily need any of these things. Sometimes, a hero can make the smallest of differences – Such as Wind Waker’s Salvatore.

In this video from my archives, I prove that there’s more to the man behind the Sinking Ships minigame…

N64 Hori Mini Pad Review – The Ultimate N64 Controller?

Greetings – My name is Lee, and this is my first post on Skirmish Frogs, hopefully the first of many posts you’ll see from me! (Sidenote – Big thanks to Eric for letting me post here). Over at PugHoofGaming, my message is first and foremost: “Keep Gaming Positive”, and that is exactly what you can expect if you head on over to the YouTube channel and subscribe. Every week, I post a new video and most of what I do post is about my main passion – Retrogaming.

I have a great deal of love for gaming hardware, and I love any excuse to talk about my collection of gaming consoles and accessories – Hence this video, taking a look at one of my favourite ever third-party controllers – Hori’s Nintendo 64 Mini Pad. What it lacks in size it makes up for in quality, but enough about that; watch the video and find out for yourself why I think this is such a great pad.

If you liked this video, by all means subscribe. You can also follow me on Twitter @PugHoofGaming – I’m always available to chat about old games and systems!