Super Game Boy Special!

Move over NX, the Super Game Boy has been letting us take takes out on a portable, and play them on a television for two decades now! But did you also know about the Japan-only Super Game Boy 2, or Hori’s special Game Boy Commander gamepad, made especially for the Super Game Boy?

Watch this video and find out more about these awesome pieces of hardware, and see that the Super Game Boy wasn’t just about playing Game Boy games on the television – In fact, it added a lot more functionality than that!

Video Transcription

Who needs the NX when you can play Game Boy games on the big screen!

95% of Nintendo related chatter these days is gravitating towards their next console, the Nintendo NX. Supposedly the hybrid of home console and portable system, the possibilities are tantalising. Being able to take games out with you on a portable system and then take them back home and play on the television is an excellent evolution of what the Nintendo Wii U offered with its GamePad.

However, you’ve been able to do something very similar all along, with Nintendo’s very own Super Game Boy!

Released in 1994, the Super Game Boy was a nifty little device that let you play Game Boy cartridges on a television, via a Super Nintendo console. It’s design is simple – Plug your Game Boy game into the Super Game Boy, slide the whole lot into your SNES cartridge slot, turn the power on and away you go. The device itself was basically the Game Boy hardware in a cartridge, so it wasn’t just simple software emulation, it was as authentic as it got – Apart from the the fact that the Super Game Boy ran games ever so slightly faster than the original hardware.

But it was a great piece of kit, that also had a few other tricks up its sleeve. For a start, you can play games with palette other than the Game Boy’s trademark green hues. You can choose from a number of pre-made palettes, or even make your own, while some older Game Boy titles even had their own preset palettes that would be loaded instantly, such as Super Mario Land and Metroid II: Return of Samus.

A number of borders were also available that surrounded the virtual Game Boy screen, with some specific games even containing their own specific borders, such as the Pokemon series, and of course you could draw your own, and you could even use a SNES mouse if you have one.

If that wasn’t all, several Super Game Boy-enabled games had bonus options – Wario Blast allowed four players to play on the Super Game Boy with one cartridge via a multi-tap, while Street Fighter 2 enabled 2 players with just one copy of the game. Some games had better music and sound effects, while Space Invaders contained a proper 16-bit version of the game on its tiny cartridge.

The Super Game Boy eventually got even better, because Japan got a second revision of the hardware. The Super Game Boy 2 arrived in 1998 and is absolutely lovely to look at, with it’s transparent blue casing and LED power light. It added a link cable socket, perfect for playing multiplayer games or more specifically, allowing for trades and battles in Pokemon. It also added 8 new borders, including my personal favourite – One that mimics the transparent Game Boys that were released later on, so you can see a pixel rendition of the system’s innards. It also fixed the speed issues that I mentioned earlier, making for an even more authentic experience.

But wait, that’s not all all – Because, there’s only one way to truly experience the Super Game Boy and that’s to use Hori’s official Super Game Boy Commander gamepad. This special controller looks just like the Game Boy’s nether regions, containing an almost identical design, albeit with extra buttons. Not only does this pad make for a more enjoyable Game Boy experience, but it also makes navigating the Super Game Boy’s menus that little easier, with specially labelled buttons for menu functions. It also places all the shoulder buttons to the face of the pad, which has its uses for other SNES games.This is truly one of the best ways to play Game Boy games on your television, except maybe the Game Boy Player, which is another story for another time.

Thank you so much for taking the time to watch this video, and I hope you found it enlightening. As always, subscribes, comments and shares are always appreciated – I always reply to all comments, as well as Tweets to @PugHoofGaming. If you liked this video, there’s plenty more great content on my channel, so why not check out my other videos?

As always – until next time, keep gaming positive.

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About PugHoofGaming

I am a writer and producer of video content, currently running my YouTube channel Pug Hoof Gaming and writing for GodisaGeek. I also occasionally freelance for other outlets, such as VICE.

4 Comments

  1. Nice! I actually just got a Super Game Boy a few weeks ago, but I haven’t been able to get any games for it yet.

    • Well luckily, there’s a ton of Game Boy games waiting for you to discover (Including the excellent Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening!). I’m going to be covering another Game Boy-related item next week, and this one’s even more unique! 🙂

  2. Nice video! I learned a few things about the Super Gameboy that I didn’t know. I have the Gamecube gameboy adapter that plays GB, GBC, and GBA, so I really never thought about getting one, but you pointed out some interesting facts.

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